Can Wall Water Fountains Help Purify The Air?

fcl124__80023.jpg An otherwise lackluster ambiance can be livened up with an indoor wall fountain. Your senses and your wellness can benefit from the putting in of one of these indoor features. If you doubt the benefits of water fountains, just look at the science supporting this idea. The negative ions generated by water features are countered by the positive ions emitted by present-day conveniences. The negative ions generated by these kinds of water features overtake the positive ones resulting in positive changes to both your mental and physical health. The higher serotonin levels resulting from these types of features make people more aware, serene and energized. The negative ions produced by indoor wall fountains promote a better mood as well as remove air impurities from your home. Water features also help in eliminating allergens, pollutants among other sorts of irritants. And lastly, dust particles and microbes in the air are eliminated and lead to improved health.

Windchimes: Previous Variations

Wind chimes are made of hanging rods made of metal, bamboo, wood, glass, or ceramic. A ringer is suspended in the center of the rods and when the wind strikes it against the rods, a soothing sound is produced. Wind chimes range in size from giant bronze bells weighing 100s of pounds to the littlest tubes designed into earrings and necklaces.

Bamboo and metal tubes several feet long are the more popular materials utilized in wind chimes these days. They make fantastic accessories both indoors or displayed on a veranda or deck. Steadily increasing in appeal are the highly musical, precision-tonal chimes companies began developing back in the seventies. Windchimes made of metal are presently available in tunable musical pitches. Some of these styles have tunings unique to diverse nationalities, such as Japanese, Hawaiian, and Balinese.

Water Transport Solutions in Ancient Rome

Aqua Anio Vetus, the first raised aqueduct assembled in Rome, began delivering the many people living in the hills with water in 273 BC, though they had counted on natural springs up till then. If people living at higher elevations did not have access to springs or the aqueduct, they’d have to be dependent on the remaining existing technologies of the day, cisterns that gathered rainwater from the sky and subterranean wells that drew the water from below ground. Beginning in the sixteenth century, a unique program was introduced, using Acqua Vergine’s subterranean sections to provide water to Pincian Hill.

All through the length of the aqueduct’s channel were pozzi, or manholes, that gave entry. During the roughly nine years he possessed the property, from 1543 to 1552, Cardinal Marcello Crescenzi employed these manholes to take water from the channel in containers, though they were initially established for the purpose of cleaning and servicing the aqueduct. Even though the cardinal also had a cistern to get rainwater, it didn’t supply a sufficient amount of water. That is when he decided to create an access point to the aqueduct that ran beneath his residence.

The Major Characteristics of Classic Greek Statues

Archaic Greeks were known for creating the first freestanding statuary; up until then, most carvings were constructed out of walls and pillars as reliefs. Younger, appealing male or female (kore) Greeks were the subject matter of most of the sculptures, or kouros figures. Regarded as by Greeks to represent splendour, the kouroi were created into inflexible, forward facing positions with one foot outstretched, and the male statues were always nude, well-developed, and fit. Life-sized versions of the kouroi appeared beginning in 650 BC. During the Archaic time, a great time of change, the Greeks were developing new types of government, expressions of art, and a greater awareness of people and cultures outside Greece. During this time and other times of historical tumult, clashes often occurred, most notably battles fought amongst city-states such as the Arcadian wars and the Spartan infiltration of Samos.

Inventors of the First Outdoor Fountains

Multi-talented people, fountain designers from the 16th to the late 18th century typically functioned as architects, sculptors, artists, engineers and highly educated scholars all in one. Leonardo da Vinci as a innovative genius, inventor and scientific expert exemplified this Renaissance master. He carefully registered his findings in his now famed notebooks about his investigations into the forces of nature and the attributes and mobility of water. Modifying private villa settings into amazing water displays full of symbolic interpretation and natural wonder, early Italian water fountain engineers combined curiosity with hydraulic and horticultural knowledge. The humanist Pirro Ligorio, celebrated for his virtuosity in archeology, architecture and garden design, delivered the vision behind the wonders in Tivoli.

Well versed in humanist subject areas as well as ancient technical texts, other fountain makers were masterminding the phenomenal water marbles, water features and water pranks for the various properties around Florence.

The Source of Today's Garden Water Fountains

The translation of hundreds of classical Greek documents into Latin was commissioned by the scholarly Pope Nicholas V who ruled the Church in Rome from 1397 till 1455. In order to make Rome worthy of being the capital of the Christian world, the Pope resolved to enhance the beauty of the city. Restoration of the Acqua Vergine, a desolate Roman aqueduct which had carried fresh drinking water into the city from eight miles away, began in 1453 at the bidding of the Pope. The ancient Roman custom of building an imposing commemorative fountain at the location where an aqueduct arrived, also known as a mostra, was resurrected by Nicholas V. At the behest of the Pope, architect Leon Battista Alberti began the construction of a wall fountain in the place where we now find the Trevi Fountain. Adjustments and extensions, included in the restored aqueduct, eventually supplied the Trevi Fountain and the well-known baroque fountains in the Piazza del Popolo and Piazza Navona with the necessary water supply.

Rome’s First Water Delivery Solutions
Rome’s first elevated aqueduct, Aqua Anio Vetus, was built in 273 BC; before that, residents residing at higher elevations had to depend on natural springs for their water. If people living at higher elevations did not have accessibility to... read more
Acqua Vergine: The Solution to Rome's Water Challenges
Rome’s very first elevated aqueduct, Aqua Anio Vetus, was built in 273 BC; prior to that, people living at higher elevations had to rely on local springs for their... read more
Interior Wall Water Elements are Great for Home or Workplace
A wall fountain is a great addition to any residence because it provides a tranquil spot where you sit and watch a favorite show after working all... read more


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