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Inventors of the First Water Features

Frequently serving as architects, sculptors, artists, engineers and discerning scholars, all in one, fountain designers were multi-talented people from the 16th to the later part of the 18th century. Leonardo da Vinci as a imaginative intellect, inventor and scientific virtuoso exemplified this Renaissance creator. The forces of nature guided him to research the qualities and motion of water, and due to his fascination, he systematically documented his ideas in his now celebrated notebooks. Remodeling private villa settings into ingenious water showcases packed of symbolic meaning and natural beauty, early Italian water fountain designers coupled imagination with hydraulic and gardening abilities. The magnificence in Tivoli were developed by the humanist Pirro Ligorio, who was widely known for his skill in archeology, architecture and garden design. Other water feature developers, masterminding the extraordinary water marbles, water functions and water humor for the various domains near Florence, were tried and tested in humanist subjects and time-honored scientific readings.

The Source of Modern Wall Fountains

Hundreds of ancient Greek records were translated into Latin under the authority of the scholarly Pope Nicholas V, who led the Roman Catholic Church from 1397 to 1455.Source Modern Wall Fountains 54033606648626.jpg Embellishing Rome and making it the worthy capital of the Christian world was at the core of his ambitions. In 1453 the Pope commissioned the reconstruction of the Aqua Vergine, an historic Roman aqueduct which had carried fresh drinking water into the city from eight miles away. The ancient Roman tradition of building an awe-inspiring commemorative fountain at the location where an aqueduct arrived, also known as a mostra, was revived by Nicholas V. The architect Leon Battista Alberti was commissioned by the Pope to build a wall fountain where we now see the Trevi Fountain. The aqueduct he had refurbished included modifications and extensions which eventually allowed it to supply water to the Trevi Fountain as well as the renowned baroque fountains in the Piazza del Popolo and the Piazza Navona.Anglo-Saxon Gardens Norman Conquest 628773043605.jpg

Anglo-Saxon Gardens During the Norman Conquest

The arrival of the Normans in the latter half of the eleventh century substantially altered The Anglo-Saxon ways of living. The expertise of the Normans surpassed the Anglo-Saxons' in architecture and agriculture at the time of the conquest. But yet there was no time for home life, domesticated design, and decoration until the Normans had overcome the whole realm. Because of this, castles were cruder constructions than monasteries: Monasteries were usually important stone buildings set in the biggest and most fertile valleys, while castles were constructed on windy crests where their inhabitants dedicated time and space to projects for offense and defense. Gardening, a quiet occupation, was impracticable in these fruitless fortifications. The early Anglo-Norman style of architecture is exemplified in Berkeley Castle, which is perhaps the most untouched sample we have. The keep is said to date from William the Conqueror's time. A massive terrace serves as a deterrent to invaders who would try to mine the walls of the building. A picturesque bowling green, covered in grass and enclosed by battlements clipped out of an ancient yew hedge, forms one of the terraces.

Outdoor Wall Fountains: The Numerous Styles on the Market

Small verandas or courtyards are an ideal place to set up wall fountains since they add style to an area with limited space. Whatever design of outdoor wall fountain you are searching for whether it be traditional, contemporary, classic, or Asian you will undoubtedly find the one you like best. If you are looking for a distinctive design, a custom-made one can be specially made to fit your specifications.

Mounted and stand-alone fountains are available on the market. You can hang a mounted wall fountain because they are small and self-contained. Typically made of resin (to resemble stone) or fiber glass, these types of fountains are lightweight and easy to hang. Free-standing fountains, often referred to as floor fountains, are sizable, have a basin located on the ground and a smooth side which leans against a wall. Normally made of cast stone, these water features have no weight constraints.

Landscape designers often recommend a customized fountain for a brand new or existing wall. A skilled mason is necessary to install the water basin against the wall and properly install all the plumbing inside or behind the wall. It is also essential to add a spout or fountain mask to build it into the wall. A custom-made wall fountain blends into the landscape instead of standing out because it was a later addition, which contributes to a cohesive appearance.

The Earliest Documented Water Features of History

Towns and villages depended on functional water fountains to conduct water for cooking, washing, and cleaning from local sources like ponds, channels, or creeks. In the days before electrical power, the spray of fountains was driven by gravity only, commonly using an aqueduct or water supply located far away in the surrounding hills. Fountains spanning history have been developed as monuments, impressing local citizens and tourists alike. The contemporary fountains of modern times bear little similarity to the first water fountains. A natural stone basin, crafted from rock, was the first fountain, utilized for containing water for drinking and spiritual functions.Earliest Documented Water Features History 065704187474885.jpg Pure stone basins as fountains have been recovered from 2000 B.C.. The force of gravity was the power source that operated the oldest water fountains. The location of the fountains was driven by the water source, which is why you’ll commonly find them along reservoirs, waterways, or streams. Fountains with embellished Gods, mythological beasts, and animals began to appear in Rome in about 6 BC, built from rock and bronze. A well-designed system of reservoirs and aqueducts kept Rome's public water fountains supplied with fresh water.