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The First Modern Wall Fountains

Himself a highly educated man, Pope Nicholas V led the Roman Catholic Church from 1397 till 1455 and was responsible for the translation of hundreds of age-old documents from their original Greek into Latin. In order to make Rome deserving of being the capital of the Christian world, the Pope resolved to enhance the beauty of the city. In 1453 the Pope commissioned the reconstruction of the Aqua Vergine, an ancient Roman aqueduct which had carried fresh drinking water into the city from eight miles away. A mostra, a monumental dedicatory fountain constructed by ancient Romans to mark the point of arrival of an aqueduct, was a practice which was restored by Nicholas V. The architect Leon Battista Alberti was commissioned by the Pope to construct a wall fountain where we now see the Trevi Fountain. The aqueduct he had reconditioned included modifications and extensions which eventually enabled it to supply water to the Trevi Fountain as well as the famed baroque fountains in the Piazza del Popolo and the Piazza Navona.

Water Fountain Engineers Through History

Multi-talented individuals, fountain designers from the 16th to the late 18th century typically functioned as architects, sculptors, artists, engineers and highly educated scholars all in one person.Water Fountain Engineers History 0770744264612704758.jpg Leonardo da Vinci, a Renaissance artist, was celebrated as a creative intellect, inventor and scientific master. He systematically reported his findings in his now celebrated notebooks about his studies into the forces of nature and the attributes and motion of water. Early Italian water feature engineers converted private villa settings into inventive water showcases full with symbolic meaning and natural elegance by coupling imagination with hydraulic and gardening talent. The splendors in Tivoli were developed by the humanist Pirro Ligorio, who was widely known for his skill in archeology, engineering and garden design. Other fountain designers, masterminding the phenomenal water marbles, water functions and water jokes for the many estates near Florence, were tried and tested in humanist subjects and time-honored scientific readings.

Rome’s First Water Transport Systems

Rome’s very first raised aqueduct, Aqua Anio Vetus, was built in 273 BC; prior to that, inhabitants residing at higher elevations had to depend on natural springs for their water. When aqueducts or springs weren’t easily accessible, people living at raised elevations turned to water drawn from underground or rainwater, which was made available by wells and cisterns. To provide water to Pincian Hill in the early sixteenth century, they implemented the brand-new tactic of redirecting the movement from the Acqua Vergine aqueduct’s underground channel. Spanning the length of the aqueduct’s network were pozzi, or manholes, that gave entry. The manholes made it less demanding to thoroughly clean the channel, but it was also achievable to use buckets to remove water from the aqueduct, as we viewed with Cardinal Marcello Crescenzi when he owned the property from 1543 to 1552, the year he passed away. He didn’t get adequate water from the cistern that he had manufactured on his residential property to collect rainwater. To provide himself with a more efficient means to assemble water, he had one of the manholes opened, giving him access to the aqueduct below his property.